Simple Deviled Eggs
Marla Sarris

Simple Deviled Eggs and Homemade Mayo

I remember when I was little always loving when our family would get together. My cousin Connie would make deviled eggs and I always thought they were so hard to make because we only ate them on special occasions. Needless to say I was super surprised at how simple they were when I first started making them. If you’ve never made deviled eggs I’d highly recommend you give them a try. They’re a great source of protein, the perfect grab-and-go snack, a lovely appetizer for parties and of course they’re super easy to pop in your mouth as you’re running out the door for a quick breakfast.

If you regularly make hard boiled eggs then you’re probably going to hate the way I make mine, but Jeff has never complained. I’ll typically add the eggs to a pan, cover them with water and just let them do their thing on the stove all on their own. I don’t time the boiling process. I don’t add the eggs once the water’s already boiling. I take the hands off approach when it comes to these babies so I can give my full attention to whatever else I’m making at the time. Yes I know there’s all these little tricks out there for how to peel an egg easier and I’m sure this isn’t the most efficient way to do it but if it tastes good in the end and I don’t have to watch them boil, I’m cool with it. :)

Apparently Friday November 2nd was National Deviled Egg Day. If it wasn’t for my friend Nicole’s tweet I would have never known deviled eggs had their own day. Must have been my kitchen intuition because that’s when I made these bad boys and we were able to “celebrate” the holiday.

Variations on Deviled Eggs

I’m in it for the taste and don’t really care how they come out looking so you won’t find me piping the yolks into the whites as you’d see with a quick Google image search for deviled eggs. I use a spoon and my fingers, I find that to be most efficient.

What’s fun about deviled eggs is there’s so many different ways to twist and play with the recipe. I’ve seen red filling by adding roasted red tomatoes or you could spice them up by mixing the yolks with sriracha. In the past I’ve made guac deviled eggs by removing the mayo and replacing it with an avocado. With just those combinations on a single plate you’ve got a nice red and green combination for Christmas! You can mince garlic or a jalapeƱo pepper and add that to the mix. There’s just so many options.

I’ve also filled the egg whites with tapenade and used the yolks for salads.

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Homemade Mayo

I’ve only tried making mayo once before and I wanted to try it again, this time with a new recipe. If you’ve never made your own mayo, I’d highly recommend Melissa Joulwan’s recipe, she even has a video you can follow here:

Only thing I can recommend is watch out for flying mayo! The lowest setting on my blender I guess is not as slow as her clean and composed version in the video. :) As I was adding the olive oil, slow and steady, I was getting mayo splatter. By the time I was done it was on the cabinets, the counter, all over my face and in my hair, but it was all worth it.

This mayo is delicious. :)

Simple Deviled Eggs

Ingredients

  • 1 dozen eggs
  • 2-3 cups water
  • 2-3 tablespoons homemade mayo (see video above for ingredients and recipe)
  • a couple pinches of sea salt
  • paprika

Directions Makes 18-24

  1. Add eggs to a pan.
  2. Add enough water to cover the eggs, but not so much that it’s to the rim of your pan. (You want to save room for the water to boil and not boil over.)
  3. Heat pan over medium heat until boiling and then let the eggs boil. I’ll usually walk away or divert my attention to something else when I start the heat so maybe 5-10 minutes after the eggs have been boiling remove from heat.
  4. Pour water out and either add cold water or just let them sit for a while. I’ll usually let them cool for around 1-2 hours, but after 30-60 minutes they should be cool enough to handle.
  5. When cool, crack each egg, remove the shell and rinse off any leftover shell under running water.
  6. Cut the egg in half along the longer side of the egg, pop out the yolk and transfer it to a bowl. Lay the egg white halves in a deviled egg tray or just in a container that will hold them upright. My container tray only holds 18 pieces so I use the leftover 3 hard boiled eggs and add them to salads.
  7. Once you’ve gotten through all the eggs use the back of a spoon and smash all the yolks so they’re crumbly.
  8. Add the mayo and sea salt to the yolks and mix together. Give it a taste, if you want it more creamy add more mayo. Note: If you’re going with an exotic version, this is when you should add that extra ingredient or two then combine and mix well.
  9. Using the spoon you used to mash the yolks scoop out about a tablespoon of mixture and add it back to the egg white holes.
  10. Sprinkle each egg with a shake or two of paprika and store them covered in the refrigerator.
  11. Enjoy! :)

Splurge on the appetizers

Comments

  1. Yum! I love deviled eggs! But I make them without mayo (I’m not a fan of it). You’re right–why do we only make them for special occasions?!? :)

    • Right!? :) I make them semi-regularly as snacks, until we get sick of them and then I wait a few months and the whole process starts over again lol

      Do you use greek yogurt or mustard instead of mayo?

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